American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic conditions worldwide, affecting about 1 in 11 adults. Its prevalence means you probably know someone who has diabetes, so being aware of this disease and how it can affect one’s life is important. This American Diabetes Month, take the time to learn about what’s true—and what isn’t—about this condition.

MYTH: Diabetes is a single disease.

FACT: Diabetes is actually a group of diseases, all of which affect how your body metabolizes blood sugar. Chronic diabetes include Type 1 and Type 2, but some forms of diabetes are also potentially reversible, like gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy. Although diabetes can develop at any age, Type 1 diabetes often shows up during childhood or adolescence, while Type 2 more commonly occurs in people over the age of 40.

MYTH: Eating a lot of sugar causes diabetes.

FACT: Diabetes is caused by your body either not making enough insulin or not using it well, both of which can increase your blood sugar levels, but eating sugar itself doesn’t directly cause someone to develop diabetes. However, excess sugar can lead to obesity, which is a significant risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

MYTH: If you don’t have a family history of diabetes, you won’t get it yourself.

FACT: While family history is a risk factor for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, other factors are also involved. In fact, you can significantly reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by maintaining a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and not smoking. 

MYTH: People who have diabetes can’t eat sweets.

FACT: As long as you plan for them, you can have a few sweets in moderation, even if you have diabetes. This planning can include decreasing your carbohydrate intake from other sources or, if you take insulin, taking a higher dose than normal. Your healthcare provider can tell you about how you can safely indulge in the occasional treat while still keeping your diabetes under control.

MYTH: It’s unsafe to exercise if you have diabetes.

FACT: Exercise is in fact a vital step to managing diabetes, because it helps increase your body’s sensitivity to insulin. However, if you do have diabetes, you should talk to your healthcare provider about how to watch for potential problems that may arise with your eyes, feet, or heart when you exercise.

The International Diabetes Foundation predicts that in the next 10 years, the number of people with diabetes around the world will rise from 463 million to 578 million, and in 25 years, it’ll reach 700 million. However, with proper knowledge about prevention and management, we can work towards slowing this growth. Have a great rest of the month, and as always, stay healthy and stay safe!

–The Wellness and Stress Clinic Team

Sources:

Coronavirus: what’s it all about?

The recent outbreak of respiratory disease has been caused by COVID-19, also known as coronavirus disease 2019. This disease has been detected in as many 60 countries internationally, which includes the United States. Coronaviruses are a very large family of viruses that are common in people and in many different species of animals. While rare, people can be infected by animals such as bats, cattle, and even cats. If you’re worried about possibly contracting and/or spreading this disease, then learning more about the disease and how it spreads will help keep you and others safe during this time.

Signs and symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

People with COVID-19 should receive as much supportive care to help relieve these symptoms since there is not a specific antiviral treatment recommended yet for this disease. If symptoms become severe, then treatment should include care to support vital organ functions. If you or someone you know is experiencing any or all of these symptoms, then make sure to visit your physician as soon as you can. The Wellness and Stress Clinic of Memphis can see you on Monday’s from 5-7pm, but if you’re in need of assistance before then try to see another provider as soon as possible to stop the spread of this disease.

There are also some simple things that you can do to keep yourself and others healthy:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Make sure to do this after going to the bathroom, before eating, after blowing your nose and/or coughing/sneezing.
  • Avoid touching your nose, eyes, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough/sneeze with a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash once you are finished. Do not reuse old tissues.

It is important to note that anyone can contract this disease and the chances of someone contracting and/or spreading this disease who is of Asian descent is not higher than someone who isn’t. Help us stop fear based racism by making sure that this is known, as it only creates more confusion and fear than necessary.

If you have any questions, please come by during our clinic hours on Monday’s from 5-7pm or email/call us with any comments, questions, or concerns. Have a happy and healthy week!

Links:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/share-facts.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/summary.html