Managing Type 2 Diabetes

More than 34 million American have diabetes (about 1 in 10), and approximately 90-95% of them have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar, aka glucose. Glucose is an important source of fuel for the body, and if the body cannot metabolize sugar correctly, then you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Increased thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Slow-healing sores
  • Increased hunger
  • Frequent hunger
  • Blurred vision
  • Frequent infections
  • Areas of darkened skin, usually in the armpits and neck

When you have type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin, which is a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into the cells in your body, or it doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain normal glucose levels. When your body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin, you may start to experience the symptoms above.

If you suspect that you may have developed type 2 diabetes or that you are at risk of developing it due to environmental factors, genetics, and/or lifestyle factors, then it may be time to see a doctor. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed using the:

  • Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test: This blood test indicates the average blood sugar level for the past 2-3 months. Normal levels are below 5.7%, and a result between 5.7 and 6.4% is considered pre-diabetes, while an A1C 6.5% or higher means that you have diabetes.

To treat and manage type 2 diabetes, you may need to:

  • Lose weight
  • Eat healthily
  • Exercise regularly
  • Possibly include diabetes medication or insulin therapy
  • Monitor your blood sugar

By losing just 5-10% of your body weight, you can make a different in your A1C because losing weight can lower your blood sugar levels. To do this, you may need to eat fewer calories, fewer refined carbohydrates, fewer foods that contain saturated fats, and more vegetables and fruits, especially those that contain a lot of fiber. Changing your diet plus aiming for 30 to 60 minutes of moderate (or 15 to 30 minutes of vigorous) mixed aerobic exercise and resistance training offers more benefits than either type of exercise alone. Examples of these exercises are:

  • Aerobic: Walking, Dancing, Biking, and Swimming
  • Resistance: Yoga and Weightlifting

If you have any questions about type 2 diabetes, or think that you may have it or be at risk for it, please call the clinic at (901) 306-5433 to schedule an appointment. As always, stay safe and healthy!

-Wellness and Stress Clinic Team

Spreading Kindness

Being kind is not only beneficial for others, but also for yourself! Recent research has shown that both giving and receiving kindness helps promote good health and general well-being. By infusing the community with kindness, you can help create a “ripple effect” that can branch into an entire network of positivity. It may seem hard to spread kindness during the quarantine, but I hope I can give you some ideas about how to create this ripple effect from the comfort of your own home.

  1. Smile
    • Whether you’re quarantining by yourself, with your pets, friends, or family, it will help you to spread kindness!
  2. Express Gratitude
    • Journal your appreciation and admiration, or tell your friends and family members how much you love and care for them!
  3. Act Generously and Give Back
    • Donate to charities, food banks, and people in need during this time. By giving back to the community, you’re spreading kindness and creating the ripple effect of positivity that the world needs right now!
  4. Post Positively
    • If you’re an avid poster (or re-poster), then make sure the content you are sharing is adding to people’s lives and creates a more positive and kind view. By sharing positive content, you’re helping to shape a more positive world.
  5. Practice Self-Kindness
    • Kindness starts with yourself. It’s important to treat yourself with the same love and care that you would treat others with. Take some time for yourself, practice self-love and self-care, and remind yourself that you deserve all of the goodness that the world has to offer.

By using these 5 tips, you can effectively spread kindness to all who need it, including yourself. If you are in need of any health services, please call the clinic at (901) 306-5433. We are open tonight, April 13th, from 5-7:15pm CST and will be offering tele-health appointments. Stay healthy and safe, and remember to help #StopTheSpread by using these tips and through the use of social distancing.

–The Wellness and Stress Clinic Team

Self-Care & COVID-19

Now more than ever is it important to quiet yourself and ask, “What do I need right now?”. Sometimes the answer might be to watch some Netflix and eat some ice cream, and sometimes it might be to journal about your feelings and experiences and cry. It is important to realize that we are going through a collectively traumatic experience, and that not everyone will be able to be as productive as they might have been before the pandemic. Not everyone will be able to do everything that they promised before the pandemic, and that’s okay. What’s most important is to remember that there are people who care about you, and that there are many tools for how to cope throughout this experience, and to know that it won’t last forever.

Here, I will share some helpful self-care options to add to your mental, physical, and emotional toolkit. Not all of these options may work for you, but I hope that this can help you to know that there are ways to help yourself during this time.

Self-care options:

  1. Feel your feelings
    • This can be done by journaling, talking to a trusted professional, loved one, or friend, and even by allowing yourself to sit with the emotions that come up. It may be uncomfortable at first, but it will help you work through the stress and anxiety that may be coming up with the uncertainty that COVID-19 brings.
  2. Go Outside & Move
    • Getting your daily dose of Vitamin D has shown to help mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety disorders. Spending anywhere between 10-30 minutes everyday to every couple of days is sufficient enough, but it depends on your skin tone and whether you are already deficient in Vitamin D. As for movement, it is important to remember to move as much as possible, whether it is to walk your dog outside everyday or to have routine exercises imbedded in your new schedule, whether they’re done inside or outside.
  3. Prioritize Sleep
    • Make sure you’re getting enough sleep every night! Naps are encouraged, being on high-alert is exhausting!
  4. Talk to a Friend/Family Member/Trusted Professional
    • Text/FaceTime/Call anyone you’d like to talk to! Everyone could use a friend right now.
  5. Lean Into Your Happy
    • Do you enjoy having coffee with a friend? Watching movies? Making art? Reading endless amounts of books? Lean into those things! Whatever makes you happy is worth having a spot in your everyday life.

You would be surprised at how helpful it is to add these things into your daily schedule! You deserve happiness, care, and your health. Also, please remember to practice safe social distancing practices during this time to keep others happy and healthy. If you have any health-related questions or concerns, please call the clinic at (901) 306-5433. I hope this helps, stay healthy and safe!

–The Wellness & Stress Clinic Team

CLINIC TELE-HEALTH SERVICES (04/06/2020)


The Wellness and Stress Clinic of Memphis is open today for tele-health appointments and we will be taking calls tonight from 5-7:15pm. If you are a current patient who needs prescription refills, test results, or an appointment, please call the clinic at (901) 306-5433. If you are in need of immediate assistance, please contact EMS. Thank you for your patience during this time, stay safe and healthy!